Fish

Cuttlefish are in potential danger if the BHP desalination plant goes ahead in the Spencer Gulf. The video below is from ABC’s Catalyst program & gives insight into why the BHP desalination plant may affect Cuttlefish numbers, and, in time may even lead to their extinction.

Point Lowly, at the top of Spencer Gulf is a Cuttlefish breeding area. The extra salt pumped back into the gulf will result in higher levels of salinity, which affects growth and mortality of the Cuttlefish eggs. BHP have said that they have taken this into account. However, Oceanographer Associate Professor Jochen Kaempf has stated that the ‘dodge tide’ which happens 3-5 times a month has the ability to stir up & move the toxic sludge resulting from salt dumping further into the Cuttlefish breeding environment.

These are highly intelligent, unique and amazing creatures that need to be protected, so please watch the video & if you would like to find out more about the desalination plant, download the BHP report below.

Download the BHP Billiton Marine Environment Report Here

Dilution Model

Dilution Model which shows where the salt will travel, according to BHP’s report

Here’s some information about Cuttlefish courtesy Wikipedia

Cow fish

The cow fish is a type of boxfish and are quite rigid. They are generally found on rocky reefs. We have about  20 species in Australia.

Fish are sometimes stranded alive in pools on outgoing tides, but usually they are dead, and a rare feast for seabirds. You might occasionally also find freshwater species on metropolitan beaches following rains that have washed fish, such as European carp, out of the Torrens.

Porcupine fish

Porcupine fish (a.k.a. balloon fish, puffer fish) Diodon sp

Best not to step on a dead, dried porcupine fish! It has nasty, long sharp spines. In a live fish the spines provide defence against predators, as does its ability to inflate its body, making the spines stick out – like an echidna in defensive mode. These fish are not built for speed.

 

 

 

Toad Fish Tetractenos

Toadfish – don’t eat!

These fish grow to about 15 cm (this one was about full size) and are common in shallow water in southern Australia. Like other members of this family, toadies are poisonous.

 

 

 

 

 

Short-headed Lamprey (a.k.a. Australian Lamprey) Mordacia mordax

Lamprey

Looking like an eel, these fish grow to about 50cm in length and move from marine to fresh water to breed. In the sea they parasitise other fish. Most fish have jaws, but Lampreys are blood sucking and have a round funnel-like mouth with many small sharp teeth.

 Continuing on with our chat with Featured speaker Sarah-Jo Lobwein and the work she does in regards to single use plastics #swapforthesea 2. Plastics - what can’t you avoid or still struggle with finding an alternative? . “Dried Dog food that’s not overly expensive (but recently found a brand that is meant to be home compostable packaging but will have to see if it passes my dog’s taste test!), potato and corn crisps (there seems to be alternative to all other snack packaging except for these) and CDs – I have always loved the joy of purchasing a new music CD and most come in plastic hard or paperboard plastic covered. Those three all have alternatives, but they are my naughty weaknesses. . The main struggle for me, as a someone who is gluten AND lactose intolerant AND travels to remote places, is sometimes I have to eat a lot of rice or just accept the plastic until I find a way to get the venue or place to change. Usually I take my own packaging with me and then bring it home to recycle, for example when I am home my bread comes in paper or reusable bags, but travelling I will take with me gluten free bread in plastic sealed bags.” . Plastic Free July example of a ready to go reusable kit you can have waiting by the door as you head out. . . . . . . . . #waronwaste #waste #saynotoplastics #refuse #recycle #reuse #repurpose #upcycle #protectourgulf #saveouroceans #gogreen #nature #conservation #climateaction #marinedebris #beachcleanup #bethechange #adelaide #fogsv #friendsofgulfstvincent
 Continuing on with our chat with Featured speaker Sarah-Jo Lobwein and the work she does in regards to single use plastics #swapforthesea . 1. Plastics - what have become your favourite swap items? . “There are technological advancements and inventions, (or rediscoveries of what society used before we became addicted to plastic), all the time that amaze me – straws made out of wheat for example, and consumable soft bio plastic packaging of pasta made out of algae that we can just throw into boiling water etc. . But my favourites are the every day items – reusable, take your own or compostable straws, cutlery, takeaway containers, coffee cups, water bottles, shopping bags, paper bin bags and produce bags because they are so easy and accessible –humans were using them before plastic was invented or became prolific. The ones that reduce waste in general such reusable or not using an item at all is the best solution (such as not using a straw), and then compostable such as paper or bamboo. . Personally I can’t believe how empty my bins are once I phased out most plastics – I use the paper sandwich/ mushroom veggie bags or paper retail shopping bags for my bin and wash out the bin if it gets dirty (and there are businesses now that can come clean your bins!) - there is always an alternative.” . . . . . . . . #waronwaste #waste #saynotoplastics #refuse #recycle #reuse #repurpose #upcycle #protectourgulf #saveouroceans #gogreen #nature #conservation #climateaction #marinedebris #beachcleanup #bethechange #adelaide #fogsv #friendsofgulfstvincent

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