Marine Environments

The Friends of Gulf St Vincent Inc. are seeking to commission an artist(s) to create an interactive, permanent, iconic public art work, which will:

– complement the location and feel of Port Noarlunga Beach

– engage and educate the public regarding the reef’s health and future opportunities if it is well cared for.

The artist(s) are encouraged to exercise artistic expression and freedom on this project, however the work will need to explore and refer to the themes outlined in the Port Noarlunga Reef Artist Brief. At this stage, we have obtained funds to pay shortlisted artists a concept fee of $1000. The piece(s) will be installed in the entranceway to Port Noarlunga Jetty at the Witton Centre, Port Noarlunga (see image) and will complement the recent development of the Witton Centre upgrade.

Click here to download the Port Noarlunga Artist Brief

Contact Rob Bosley for more information on bybeach@adam.com.au

 

 

Hi all,

The below is a callout to be involved in the Penguin census via Kristy Manning, Seascape Liaison OfficerNatural Resources Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges… The last date to be involved is the 20th October. Read below for more information.


 Penguin Census

This is your chance to be involved in the 2014 Granite Island Penguin Census

The annual penguin census is nearly underway and volunteers are needed to count Little Penguins and their burrows on Granite Island.

Date: Monday 13 and 20 October 2014

Time: 10.00am – 2.00pm

Location: To be advised on registration

What to bring with you: torch (not halogen) with new batteries, snacks, water, appropriate clothing for weather conditions, covered shoes, hat

Information gained from the census will aid the ongoing monitoring of the colony and this work is funded by the Adelaide & Mt Lofty Ranges Natural Resources Management Board.

Participants will need to be able to climb, stretch and bend to locate penguin burrows which are scattered over the entire island. More information is contained in the attached flyer.

To register your interest, please contact the census coordinator Dr Diane Colombelli-Négrel on:

Email: diane.colombelli-negrel@flinders.edu.au

Phone: 8201 7649

Exact meeting location will be provided when you register

This is an article sourced from the ABC Website:

New technology to map the seabed could lead to more frequent monitoring of the health of seagrass off the South Australian coast.

SA Water and a Taiwanese university are testing the technology in Saint Vincent Gulf, towing a sensor behind a boat.

Read more here

Additional to this article is a channel 7 news report which includes video. Click here to view

Download the Media Release – 050514-MediaRelease-seagrassmapping

Seabed Mapping

Seabed Mapping

Cuttlefish are in potential danger if the BHP desalination plant goes ahead in the Spencer Gulf. The video below is from ABC’s Catalyst program & gives insight into why the BHP desalination plant may affect Cuttlefish numbers, and, in time may even lead to their extinction.

Point Lowly, at the top of Spencer Gulf is a Cuttlefish breeding area. The extra salt pumped back into the gulf will result in higher levels of salinity, which affects growth and mortality of the Cuttlefish eggs. BHP have said that they have taken this into account. However, Oceanographer Associate Professor Jochen Kaempf has stated that the ‘dodge tide’ which happens 3-5 times a month has the ability to stir up & move the toxic sludge resulting from salt dumping further into the Cuttlefish breeding environment.

These are highly intelligent, unique and amazing creatures that need to be protected, so please watch the video & if you would like to find out more about the desalination plant, download the BHP report below.

Download the BHP Billiton Marine Environment Report Here

Dilution Model

Dilution Model which shows where the salt will travel, according to BHP’s report

Here’s some information about Cuttlefish courtesy Wikipedia

See below a letter from a concerned citizen about the proposed hillside mine at Pine Point.

 
Hi Val
Thankyou for listening to my concerns today.
 
As you are now aware I am concerned about the damage that will be done to a very unique part of our South Australian coast line once a road is built along the top of the cliffs to skirt the proposed Hillside Mine at Pine Point. I believe the colours in the cliffs rival the cliffs of Rainbow Beach in Queensland which are a tourist attraction for that state. In thinking this, I may be overselling them, but I do not think so. The fact is few people have seen these cliffs for they can only be reached on foot, even though they begin just past the first head land, about 200 metres from the car park. I am anxious to get second opinions.
 
With so many concerns being raised by locals about the proposed mine, people are overlooking the destruction that will occur to this unique coastal asset. When the tide is in, the little bays with the coloured cliffs behind, provide a beautiful and peaceful beach walk. Unfortunately this will be lost forever next year, once gullies are filled in, tops of cliffs levelled and rubble pushed down the cliff face, in order to build the new main road that will run along the top.
 
Regretfully I think the mine will go ahead which will be a tragedy for all generations that follow ours. Taking the road inland would however at least be one good thing that could be done for the generations that follow ours.
Enclosed are a few photos I took on my phone at Easter. These photos include a random shot which shows the incredible range of rocks that are scattered all along the foreshore, another feature of this area.
Pine Point Cliffs
Pine Point Cliffs
Rocks scattered all along the foreshore

Rocks scattered all along the foreshore

My hope is that people will take notice of these cliffs before it is too late, and if they agree with me, then action will be taken to see that the road is redirected inland, not along the coast.
 
Regards
Bob Hawes
 

If you have any input into this issue, please use our comments area below to have your say. Thanks

 

Interesting article on the PLOS One site:

Anthropogenic litter is present in all marine habitats, from beaches to the most remote points in the oceans. On the seafloor, marine litter, particularly plastic, can accumulate in high densities with deleterious consequences for its inhabitants. Yet, because of the high cost involved with sampling the seafloor, no large-scale assessment of distribution patterns was available to date. Here, we present data on litter distribution and density collected during 588 video and trawl surveys across 32 sites in European waters.

We found litter to be present in the deepest areas and at locations as remote from land as the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone across the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The highest litter density occurs in submarine canyons, whilst the lowest density can be found on continental shelves and on ocean ridges. Plastic was the most prevalent litter item found on the seafloor. Litter from fishing activities (derelict fishing lines and nets) was particularly common on seamounts, banks, mounds and ocean ridges. Our results highlight the extent of the problem and the need for action to prevent increasing accumulation of litter in marine environments.

Marine Litter

Marine Litter

Read more and view figures and images here

 Continuing on with our chat with Featured speaker Sarah-Jo Lobwein and the work she does in regards to single use plastics #swapforthesea 2. Plastics - what can’t you avoid or still struggle with finding an alternative? . “Dried Dog food that’s not overly expensive (but recently found a brand that is meant to be home compostable packaging but will have to see if it passes my dog’s taste test!), potato and corn crisps (there seems to be alternative to all other snack packaging except for these) and CDs – I have always loved the joy of purchasing a new music CD and most come in plastic hard or paperboard plastic covered. Those three all have alternatives, but they are my naughty weaknesses. . The main struggle for me, as a someone who is gluten AND lactose intolerant AND travels to remote places, is sometimes I have to eat a lot of rice or just accept the plastic until I find a way to get the venue or place to change. Usually I take my own packaging with me and then bring it home to recycle, for example when I am home my bread comes in paper or reusable bags, but travelling I will take with me gluten free bread in plastic sealed bags.” . Plastic Free July example of a ready to go reusable kit you can have waiting by the door as you head out. . . . . . . . . #waronwaste #waste #saynotoplastics #refuse #recycle #reuse #repurpose #upcycle #protectourgulf #saveouroceans #gogreen #nature #conservation #climateaction #marinedebris #beachcleanup #bethechange #adelaide #fogsv #friendsofgulfstvincent
 Continuing on with our chat with Featured speaker Sarah-Jo Lobwein and the work she does in regards to single use plastics #swapforthesea . 1. Plastics - what have become your favourite swap items? . “There are technological advancements and inventions, (or rediscoveries of what society used before we became addicted to plastic), all the time that amaze me – straws made out of wheat for example, and consumable soft bio plastic packaging of pasta made out of algae that we can just throw into boiling water etc. . But my favourites are the every day items – reusable, take your own or compostable straws, cutlery, takeaway containers, coffee cups, water bottles, shopping bags, paper bin bags and produce bags because they are so easy and accessible –humans were using them before plastic was invented or became prolific. The ones that reduce waste in general such reusable or not using an item at all is the best solution (such as not using a straw), and then compostable such as paper or bamboo. . Personally I can’t believe how empty my bins are once I phased out most plastics – I use the paper sandwich/ mushroom veggie bags or paper retail shopping bags for my bin and wash out the bin if it gets dirty (and there are businesses now that can come clean your bins!) - there is always an alternative.” . . . . . . . . #waronwaste #waste #saynotoplastics #refuse #recycle #reuse #repurpose #upcycle #protectourgulf #saveouroceans #gogreen #nature #conservation #climateaction #marinedebris #beachcleanup #bethechange #adelaide #fogsv #friendsofgulfstvincent

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