Marine Life

The Friends of Gulf St Vincent Inc. are seeking to commission an artist(s) to create an interactive, permanent, iconic public art work, which will:

– complement the location and feel of Port Noarlunga Beach

– engage and educate the public regarding the reef’s health and future opportunities if it is well cared for.

The artist(s) are encouraged to exercise artistic expression and freedom on this project, however the work will need to explore and refer to the themes outlined in the Port Noarlunga Reef Artist Brief. At this stage, we have obtained funds to pay shortlisted artists a concept fee of $1000. The piece(s) will be installed in the entranceway to Port Noarlunga Jetty at the Witton Centre, Port Noarlunga (see image) and will complement the recent development of the Witton Centre upgrade.

Click here to download the Port Noarlunga Artist Brief

Contact Rob Bosley for more information on bybeach@adam.com.au

 

 

Hi all,

The below is a callout to be involved in the Penguin census via Kristy Manning, Seascape Liaison OfficerNatural Resources Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges… The last date to be involved is the 20th October. Read below for more information.


 Penguin Census

This is your chance to be involved in the 2014 Granite Island Penguin Census

The annual penguin census is nearly underway and volunteers are needed to count Little Penguins and their burrows on Granite Island.

Date: Monday 13 and 20 October 2014

Time: 10.00am – 2.00pm

Location: To be advised on registration

What to bring with you: torch (not halogen) with new batteries, snacks, water, appropriate clothing for weather conditions, covered shoes, hat

Information gained from the census will aid the ongoing monitoring of the colony and this work is funded by the Adelaide & Mt Lofty Ranges Natural Resources Management Board.

Participants will need to be able to climb, stretch and bend to locate penguin burrows which are scattered over the entire island. More information is contained in the attached flyer.

To register your interest, please contact the census coordinator Dr Diane Colombelli-Négrel on:

Email: diane.colombelli-negrel@flinders.edu.au

Phone: 8201 7649

Exact meeting location will be provided when you register

Cuttlefish are in potential danger if the BHP desalination plant goes ahead in the Spencer Gulf. The video below is from ABC’s Catalyst program & gives insight into why the BHP desalination plant may affect Cuttlefish numbers, and, in time may even lead to their extinction.

Point Lowly, at the top of Spencer Gulf is a Cuttlefish breeding area. The extra salt pumped back into the gulf will result in higher levels of salinity, which affects growth and mortality of the Cuttlefish eggs. BHP have said that they have taken this into account. However, Oceanographer Associate Professor Jochen Kaempf has stated that the ‘dodge tide’ which happens 3-5 times a month has the ability to stir up & move the toxic sludge resulting from salt dumping further into the Cuttlefish breeding environment.

These are highly intelligent, unique and amazing creatures that need to be protected, so please watch the video & if you would like to find out more about the desalination plant, download the BHP report below.

Download the BHP Billiton Marine Environment Report Here

Dilution Model

Dilution Model which shows where the salt will travel, according to BHP’s report

Here’s some information about Cuttlefish courtesy Wikipedia

Interesting article on the PLOS One site:

Anthropogenic litter is present in all marine habitats, from beaches to the most remote points in the oceans. On the seafloor, marine litter, particularly plastic, can accumulate in high densities with deleterious consequences for its inhabitants. Yet, because of the high cost involved with sampling the seafloor, no large-scale assessment of distribution patterns was available to date. Here, we present data on litter distribution and density collected during 588 video and trawl surveys across 32 sites in European waters.

We found litter to be present in the deepest areas and at locations as remote from land as the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone across the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The highest litter density occurs in submarine canyons, whilst the lowest density can be found on continental shelves and on ocean ridges. Plastic was the most prevalent litter item found on the seafloor. Litter from fishing activities (derelict fishing lines and nets) was particularly common on seamounts, banks, mounds and ocean ridges. Our results highlight the extent of the problem and the need for action to prevent increasing accumulation of litter in marine environments.

Marine Litter

Marine Litter

Read more and view figures and images here

Sylvia Earle is the leading lady of marine biology, in fact the leading person full stop. Here she explains why the oceans are important & how we can protect them. She tells us about her one wish to change the world & is a total inspiration. Well worth watching!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43DuLcBFxoY

Some more information about Sylvia here:
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/sylvia-earle/

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