Sharks and Rays

Did you hear about the extremely rare magpie fiddler ray Trygonorrhina melaleuca caught by fishermen in the Port River last week? There is a nice item about it on the ABC website (see link below), including an interview SARDI researcher Paul Rogers who is making some observations on the ray before releasing it back into the Port River at the request of the anglers who caught her.

Image from Fishes of Australia website (SA Museum specimen)

Image from Fishes of Australia website (SA Museum specimen)

This story is significant for many reasons.

1. This is a ray that has only ever been seen a few times before, and yet still exists – in the Port River – and we know so little about it!

2. It reminds us that there are many species that are unknown or not well understood, and that opportunities to learn more about them are valuable.

3. The anglers who caught the ray (from the Adelaide Game Fishers Club) recognised that they had caught something special, contacted SARDI and have requested that the ray be released back into the river.

4. It adds weight to the argument for protection of biodiversity in the Port River, which clearly supports some interesting species, despite being a busy industrial area.

 

 

Magpie ray story on ABC 891

There are a few types of eggs or egg masses that are easy to recognize on the beach. Considering how many marine animals actually lay eggs, it is a bit surprising how few we see regularly!

 

The egg mass produced by a couple of species of the moon snail (Polinices conicus and P sordidus) is often mistaken for a jellyfish. That’s because you can barely see the miniscule eggs, but they are held in a transparent, firm, sausage-shaped jelly matrix. They start to appear on the beach in spring.

The moon snail (Polinices sp) lays eggs in a jelly-like matrix.

 

Eggs mass of the moon snail – not a jellyfish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Squid eggs are also easy to recognize because they are soft, whitish and clumped together in a bunch.

A clump of squid eggs. There can be four or five eggs in each of the ‘fingers’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A slightly mangled Port Jackson Shark egg.

The most common shark egg cases we find locally are those of either the Port Jackson sharks or skates. They are dark brown, rubbery and shiny when fresh, but when hatched or dry become hard brittle. The Port Jackson shark egg case is spiral shaped, tapering from the base to the tip. Skate egg cases are shaped like small pillows, with tendrils on each corner.

 We continue our conversation with featured speaker Sarah-Jo Lobwein about the work she does regarding single use plastics #swapforthesea . What has been your favourite or most impactful achievement to date? . “When another local venue or business in my local council area contacts us to work with them or to promote that they have embraced plastic-free alternatives, they add to the growing tide of change happening locally and globally. . This then adds more support, influence and encouragement for more businesses and individuals to become aware and change their behaviours. . Personally, working with the next generations also has a great personal, local and global impact. Children are amazed and shocked when they find out what items consist of plastic (such as chewing gum) or why a product cannot be recycled, or why an animal has died from plastic pollution. . They innocently yet intelligently ask “why” we use single use plastics and why companies use ‘hidden’ plastics without public notification and think of easy solutions rather than making excuses to keep polluting. . They still go and purchase an ice cream wrapped in plastic packaging, but the seed is planted in their thoughts, and it is not their responsibility that the packaging is harmful; it is the brand’s responsibility to be providing a sustainable option.” . To our #FoGSV Community, what impact can you have? Think of the ripple effect, your action can and will have an onflow affect. You can influence family, friends, your work and local businesses just by being an inspiration in your own circle of influence. . . . . . . #waronwaste #waste #saynotoplastics #refuse #recycle #reuse #repurpose #upcycle #protectourgulf #saveouroceans #gogreen #nature #conservation #climateaction #marinedebris #beachcleanup #bethechange #adelaide #fogsv #friendsofgulfstvincent
 . Following on from our first instalment, we hear more on Sarah-Jo’s presentation and look out at the end, you may be shocked! . Please provide a brief overview of your talk topic: . “Sea Change - Local plastic pollution, marine conservation and Community Empowerment through Education, Awareness, and Action to change attitudes and practices and  #SWAPFORTHESEA - empowering the community and individuals to change their behaviour by discussing and embracing simple everyday, sustainable swaps that are easy to do, and will drastically reduce your plastic consumption while maintaining a ‘convenient’ lifestyle! . Immiscible - why water and plastics do not mix - simple solutions to avoid single use plastic pollution to Stop the sea drowning in plastic - Global pollution, Global solution - raising the awareness of contributing countries, communities and individuals. . Simple plastic-free alternatives and choices to follow without changing our convenient lifestyles at home and while travelling the seven seas, which will have a huge positive effect for the ocean, the flora and fauna and ultimately ourselves! An engaging look at a serious problem including the ‘hidden’ plastics we use (did you know most chewing gum is made of plastic?), the effects on marine life and humans, and easy preventative actions for individuals.” . Did you know about the chewing gum?  . . . . . . #waronwaste #waste #saynotoplastics #refuse #recycle #reuse #repurpose #upcycle #protectourgulf #saveouroceans #gogreen #nature #conservation #climateaction #marinedebris #beachcleanup #bethechange #adelaide #fogsv #friendsofgulfstvincent

Copyright © 2019. Friends of Gulf St Vincent. All Rights Reserved. | Site Admin